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Thangka; Qing Dynasty “Shakyamuni Buddha” - Peking style. - $1,500 (Santa Barbara)

Thangka; Qing Dynasty  “Shakyamuni Buddha” - Peking style. 1 thumbnailThangka; Qing Dynasty  “Shakyamuni Buddha” - Peking style. 2 thumbnailThangka; Qing Dynasty  “Shakyamuni Buddha” - Peking style. 3 thumbnailThangka; Qing Dynasty  “Shakyamuni Buddha” - Peking style. 4 thumbnail
Thangka; Qing Dynasty “Shakyamuni Buddha” - Peking style.
The piece measures 16” x 23”. With the (very old) border it measures 20” x 32”. The outside of the frame measures 22” x 34”. There is glass in the front of the frame to protect the art piece.
My grandfather acquired this Thangka as an investment grade antique about 1930 so my guess and examination date the piece to about 1850-1900.
Given the age and uniqueness of this Thangka, it is difficult to find a concrete comp from past auctions, but Sotheby’s sold a Thangka in 2016 of comparable age and also with a Shakyamuni Buddha in the center for $19,179.
Thangkas are sacred objects hung on the walls of homes, monasteries, temples and shrines. They were primarily intended to be an object of focus during meditation, but also used as objects of homage and in spiritual practice. Thangkas were originally created by traveling monks because the scroll paintings were easy to roll up and transport from monastery to monastery, where they were also used by the monks for teaching. Thangkas were created under exacting rules, and the process of learning to paint Thangkas under a Tibetan Master was rigorous requiring about 10 years of training to become a Thangka painter.
This thangkas is a “trithang” (meaning it is painted, rather than woven) and, more specifically a “tsonthang” (meaning it has different colors for the background). The “pigments” were made from different minerals which were ground into a dust and mixed with a binder.
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post id: 7736812275

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